Category Archives: subject – object

Me Me Me: Special Request Topic!

An anonymous reader of DailyWritingTip.com has asked me to address this topic because another reader (well-known in some circles) is notorious for publicly making this grammatical error.

My mother gave Fred and I tickets to the symphony.

Avoiding the grammatical mumbo-jumbo, I will simply repeat a little test your English teachers probably gave you. If you want to know whether to use “so-and-so and I” or “so-and-so and ME,” simply remove “so-and-so and” from the sentence, and all will be made clear! Here’s what it looks like in the example above, removing “Fred and” from the sentence:

My mother gave I tickets to the symphony.

Clearly, the correct word is “me,” as in, “My mother gave Fred and me tickets to the symphony.”

Let’s take a look at a rather famous lyric sung by Motown legend Diana Ross:

If we hold on together
I know our dreams
Will never die
Dreams see us through
To forever
Where clouds roll by
For you and I

Using our test, we get rid of “you and” from the lyric, and we get:

If we hold on together
I know our dreams
Will never die
Dreams see us through
To forever
Where clouds roll by
For I

Clearly, clouds to not roll by for I, so we must use “me.”

If we hold on together
I know our dreams
Will never die
Dreams see us through
To forever
Where clouds roll by
For you and ME

Of course, that doesn’t rhyme, so may we offer this humble suggestion you might use the next time you select this as your karaoke choice?

If we hold on together
I know our dreams
Will always be
Dreams see us through
To forever
Where clouds, they flee
From you and me!

Sure, it lacks a certain poetry, but have you read the rest of the words to this song?

* NOTE FOR LOVERS OF HAWAIIAN MUSIC
You are almost certainly thinking of a certain song sung on local radio by the revered Israel Kamakawiwo’ole in which the phrase “for you and I” is repeated ad nauseum. I was going to use that as my example, but the issue is complicated by the fact that each time it is used in the song, “for you and I” actually completes a lyric that is begun in Hawaiian. Not being familiar enough with the conventions of Hawaiian grammar, I didn’t think I should offer a correction in ignorance to that mind-blowing degree.